National Institute Hosts “Ten Restaurants That Changed America”

The National Institute of Social Sciences hosted “Ten Restaurants That Changed America” on Tuesday, August 7, at Marta, in the Redbury Hotel in New York City. It was sweltering outside, but it was all cool conversation within, as guests enjoyed a catered reception followed by a lively discussion with Paul Freedman, author of “Ten Restaurants That Changed America” (2014?) and Richard Coraine, partner and chief of staff at Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group.

Fred Larsen, the National Institute’s president, welcomed the assembled guests, noting that this was the sort of spirited, interesting dialogue that the organization was committed to hosting. 

 

Professor Freedman asked “if there is such a thing as American cuisine?” The restaurants that he included in his book, which is coming out as a paperback with new material in October, were not necessarily the best, but the most influential, and ranged from Howard Johnson’s to the Four Seasons.

He noted that recent dining trends, as exemplified by Shake Shack, “takes a fairly familiar food and emphasizes the quality of the ingredients.”

Mr. Coraine said that “full-service restaurants are being challenged as never before” but that chefs were “still trying to express creativity,” not only through traditional restaurants but through new venues like food trucks. “There are more choices than there have ever been,” he said.

The gathering drew in participants ranging from Professor Freedman’s former students, to longtime National Institute members, to those drawn by a conversation about the place of restaurants in American culture. 

 

Daniel Kahneman, Geraldine Kunstadter, and Elizabeth Barlow Rogers to Receive Gold Medals for 2018

Three to be Honored at 104th Annual Dinner in New York City on November 29

The National Institute of Social Sciences will honor Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman, philanthropist and international not-for-profit leader Geraldine Kunstadter, and author and landscape preservationist Elizabeth Barlow Rogers at its 104th Gold Medal Dinner on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at the Metropolitan Club in New York City.

“I am delighted to welcome three such distinguished contributors to society to the ranks of the National Institute’s Gold Medal honorees,” says Fred Larsen, president of the National Institute. “As the preamble to our organization’s constitution states, ‘Those whose public contributions make possible significant strides in sustaining and advancing society are role models for future generations.’ Our 2018 honorees deserve the highest praise and recognition for the role models they have become."

“We invite Institute members and guests to join us this November to celebrate their accomplishments,” he says.

Daniel Kahneman (top left) is professor emeritus of Psychology and Public Affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School and the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology Emeritus at Princeton, and a fellow of the Center for Rationality at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He is the author of Thinking, Fast and Slow, which won the National Academy of Sciences Book Award and was selected by The New York Times Book Review as one of the best books of 2011. Among his many honors, he has won the Warren Medal of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (1995), the Hilgard Award for Career Contributions to General Psychology (1995), the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (2002), the Lifetime Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association (2007), and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2013). He is a member of the National Academy of Science, the Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Geraldine Kunstadter (center) is the chairman and president of the Albert Kunstadter Family Foundation, a private foundation actively engaged in domestic and international projects and programs. She brings to the foundation a background in languages, international affairs, and years of public service. In this role, she has spearheaded the funding of programs in Central America, southern Africa, Hong Kong, China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. Mrs. Kunstadter has worked at the New York City Commission for the United Nations and Consular Corps, directed the Commission’s Host Family Program, and been an NGO Representative at the UN’s International Institute of Rural Reconstruction. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Overseas Development Council, the National Committee on United States-China Relations, and the Peace Links Leadership Network. A trustee of the National Institute of Social Sciences, she previously served as the organization’s president (1979-81).

Elizabeth Barlow Rogers (right) is the president of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. A native of San Antonio, she earned a B.A. degree from Wellesley College and an M.A. in city planning from Yale. In 1979, she was appointed administrator of Central Park in New York City. The following year, to mobilize citizen support for the park’s restoration and renewal, she initiated the Central Park Conservancy, the nation’s first public-private park partnership. She was the Conservancy’s president until 1996, when she founded the Cityscape Institute. In 2002, she created the Garden History and Landscape Studies curriculum at the Bard Graduate Center, and in 2005 she established the Foundation for Landscape Studies, with the mission to promote an active understanding of the meaning of place in human life through support of landscape-history scholarship, publication of the journal Site/Lines, and collaboration with other organizations and institutions on landscape-related projects. 

The National Institute has honored distinguished Americans with Gold Medals annually since 1913. Recipients are chosen by a Medals Committee appointed by the NISS president. Recent Gold Medal recipients include economists Paul Krugman and Robert Shiller, biographers Ron Chernow and Robert Caro, and historians Robert Putnam and Eric Foner, among others. National Institute members will receive details about the dinner in the fall.

For more information, please contact Dr. Timothy Cross, executive director, at 347-261-4567 or admin@socialsciencesinstitute.org.

About the National Institute of Social Sciences
Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences (www.socialsciencesinstitute.org) is a voluntary association of public-spirited citizens. Our members include social scientists, educators, business professionals, philanthropists, academics, and the intellectually curious who believe the social sciences offer broad and valuable insights into issues of urgent and lasting concern. The National Institute promotes the study of the social sciences, supports social science research and discussion, and honors individuals who have rendered distinguished service to humanity.

 

 

 

National Institute Hosts "Ten Restaurants That Changed America," Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Ten Restaurants That Changed America: 
A Conversation with Paul Freedman

How have restaurants changed the way Americans live? Join us on Tuesday, August 7, for a catered reception and lively, informed discussion with Paul Freedman, author of "Ten Restaurants That Changed America." Richard Coraine, partner at Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group, will join Mr. Freedman in a conversation about how the country's most influential restaurants have affected American society.

 Paul Freedman

Paul Freedman

This special event will take place at Marta, in the Redbury Hotel at 29 East 29th Street in New York City. Marta is Danny Meyer’s take on rustic Roman fare imbued with a New York sensibility. The reception, catered by executive chef Lena Ciardullo, will be held on Marta’s terrace followed by a discussion in the ballroom.

This event is a must for food lovers and anyone interested American social and cultural trends.

$50 per person
Business casual attire

Due to limited seating, please RSVP as soon as possible.

Questions? Please contact Tim Cross at admin@socialsciencesinstitute.org or 347-261-4579.

“Beauty, Optimism, and the Waves of History.” NEH's Jon Parrish Peede Addresses New York Luncheon

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"No intellectual subject is outside the scope of the humanities," says  Jon Parrish Peede.

Mr. Peede, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, talked about “Beauty, Optimism, and the Waves of History" at the National Institute's 27th annual discussion luncheon, held on Tuesday, June 12 at the Cornell Club of New York.

Fred Larsen, president of the National Institute, introduced Mr. Peede, who was confirmed as chairman in April 2018 after having served as acting chairman since 2017.

One of the country’s oldest honorary societies, the National Institute (socialsciencesinstitute.org) hosts annual luncheons in New York City and Palm Beach, Florida. Each year since 1913, the organizations has presented Gold Honor Medals to distinguished Americans for service to humanity.

Jon Parrish Peede Confirmed as NEH Chairman

Peede Official Photo.jpg

On Thursday, April 26, the U.S. Senate confirmed Jon Parrish Peede as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities by unanimous consent. Mr. Peede, who will address the National Institute's annual discussion luncheon in New York City on Tuesday, June 12, had been acting head of the endowment.

 

For more information on Mr. Peede's confirmation, please visit here.

For information on the New York City luncheon, please e-mail admin@socialsciencesinsitute.org.

To purchase tickets online, please visit http://www.socialsciencesinstitute.org/payments/.

 

NEH's Jon Parrish Peede to Address New York Luncheon on Tuesday, June 12

 Jon Parrish Peede

Jon Parrish Peede

Jon Parrish Peede, who was recently confirmed by the U.S. Senate as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, will be the keynote speaker at the National Institute’s annual luncheon, which will be held on Tuesday, June 12, at the Cornell Club of New York.

 

Until his confirmation, Mr. Peede had been senior deputy chairman at the NEH and had served as the agency’s acting director since May 2017. His previous positions include publisher of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia, literature grants director at the National Endowment for the Arts, counselor to NEA Chairman Dana Gioia, director of the NEA Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience program, director of the NEA Big Read program, director of communications at Millsaps College, founding editor of Millsaps Magazine, and editor at Mercer University Press.

From 2007 to 2011, Mr. Peede oversaw the NEA’s funding of literary organizations and fellowships to creative writers and translators. For seven years, he led writing workshops for U.S. troops in Afghanistan, Bahrain, England, Italy, Kyrgyzstan, the Persian Gulf, and on domestic bases.

He has served on the national council of the Margaret Walker Center for the Study of the African-American Experience, Jackson State University; the advisory committee of Virginia Festival of the Book, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities; and the poet laureate selection committee, state of Mississippi, office of the governor. 

In The New York Times, James Grossman, the executive director of the American Historical Association, praised Mr. Peede’s “deep commitment to the humanities and the work of the N.E.H.” 

Mr. Peede holds a bachelor’s degree in English from Vanderbilt University, and a master’s in Southern Studies from the University of Mississippi. He is the co-editor of Inside the Church of Flannery O’Connor: Sacrament, Sacramental, and the Sacred in Her Fiction (Mercer, 2007) and editor of a bilingual anthology of contemporary American fiction (Lo que cuenta el vecino: cuentos contemporáneos de los Estados Unidos [UNUM: Mexico City, 2008].) 

For more information, please e-mail admin@socialsciencesinstitute.org.

This story has been updated to reflect Chairman Peede's confirmation by the U.S. Senate.

Former National Institute President Clarence F. Michalis Passes Away

 Clarence F. Michalis

Clarence F. Michalis

The National Institute of Social Sciences mourns the passing of Clarence F. Michalis on March 30. He was 96. A longtime member of the National Institute, Mr. Michalis served on its executive committee and as president from 2001 to 2006. He was a former executive at First National City Bank and then Bristol-Meyers Squibb. He served as mayor of Lattingtown, Long Island, for more than 45 years, becoming the longest-serving mayor in the history of New York State.

Bonnie McElveen-Hunter to Headline Florida Luncheon on March 19

 Ambassador Bonnie McElveen-Hunter

Ambassador Bonnie McElveen-Hunter

Ambassador Bonnie McElveen-Hunter will headline the 28th annual luncheon of the Florida Chapter of the National Institute of Social Sciences on Monday, March 19 in Palm Beach.

She will discuss “from success to significance” drawing on her personal experiences.

Ambassador McElveen-Hunter is chief executive officer of Pace, a company she founded in 1973. Pace is now the largest independently owned custom content agency in the nation, serving Fortune 500 and leading companies, including Southwest Airlines, Walmart, Wells Fargo, Verizon, and Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts. 

In 2004, she was elected as chair of the board of the American Red Cross. In 2007, she co-founded The Tiffany Circle Society of Women Leaders, which has grown to include 63 chapters across the United States. Tiffany Circle chapters have raised nearly $90 million for the American Red Cross. 

From 2001-2003, McElveen-Hunter served as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Finland. As ambassador, she initiated the Stop Child Trafficking: End Modern-Day Slavery and Children of Karelia program, and founded the Women Business Leaders Summit, a model for business entrepreneurship partnering women business leaders. She was awarded one of Finland’s highest honors: Commander Grand Cross of the Order of the Lion. 

As a long-time philanthropist and charitable-cause activist, she has served on the International Board of Directors of Habitat for Humanity, chaired the Alexis de Tocqueville Society, served on the United Way of America Board (and on its National Leadership Council), and founded the United Way Billion Dollar National Women’s Leadership Initiative. 

“If I had to describe Bonnie McElveen-Hunter in one word, that word would be ‘extraordinary,’” said former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. “We have been good friends for many years, and I count myself as one her greatest admirers.”

For information about the luncheon, please contact May Bell Lin, executive secretary of the Florida Chapter, at maybell_lin@bellsouth.net.

 

Lawyer and Philanthropist Charlotte Armstrong Passes Away

 Mrs. Charlotte Armstrong, 27 April 2011.

Mrs. Charlotte Armstrong, 27 April 2011.

The National Institute of Social Sciences mourns the passing of longtime member and former trustee Charlotte Armstrong, who died on December 8, 2017, at Quarry Hill, Maine, where she lived. She was 90.

Mrs. Armstrong, who earned her bachelor's degree from Radcliffe and a master's from Columbia, went on to earn a law degree from Harvard in the first class to admit women to the Law School. She went on to a distinguished career in law, academia, and philanthropy. At the National Institute, she served for many years as a trustee and on the Executive Committee as a vice president. 

Read a complete obituary here.

Chernow, Shiller and Sovern Receive Gold Medals at November Gala

 National Institute President Fred Larsen with Gold Medal Honorees Ron Chernow, Robert J. Shiller and Michael I. Sovern

National Institute President Fred Larsen with Gold Medal Honorees Ron Chernow, Robert J. Shiller and Michael I. Sovern

On Tuesday, November 14, the National Institute of Social Sciences hosted its annual Gold Medal Dinner at a private club in Manhattan. The event honored Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Ron Chernow, Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert J. Shiller, and Columbia University president emeritus Michael I. Sovern.

The dinner introduced the organization’s new president, Fred Larsen, who succeeded Chauncey G. Olinger, Jr. Mr. Olinger, who led the National Institute for 11 years, was awarded the National Institute’s silver medal in recognition of his many contributions to the organization. Although an injury prevented Mr. Olinger from attending the dinner, he listened to the presentation and thanked the guests via a phone link.

Professor Sovern, who has spent more than half a century at Columbia University as both a teacher and administrator, is credited with helping Columbia heal after the chaos caused by the 1968 student uprising. In his remarks, he noted that this was a difficult time for the liberal arts at American universities.

New York Times columnist Paul Krugman, himself a Nobel laureate in economics, introduced Professor Shiller, who teaches at Yale, as “one of my great heroes.” Professor Krugman noted “how beautiful, how elegant Bob's work has been over the years.”

In accepting his medal, Professor Shiller, who jointly received the 2013 Nobel Prize in economic sciences, emphasized the “unity of knowledge” and placed his own work into a wider context. “The human mind is trained to understand through narrative,” he said.

Mr. Chernow is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning “Washington: A Life:” and “Hamilton,” which inspired the hit Broadway musical, among other works. His most recent biography, “Grant,” which was released in October, has been recognized as one of the most important books of 2017.

Mr. Chernow noted that “we are in a moment in history when we’re at war with ourselves.” Discussing the controversy about Confederate war memorials, he noted that it was “regrettable that southern identity is wrapped up in these symbols” and that “it’s time to take them down.”

One of the country’s oldest honorary societies, the National Institute of Social Sciences presents Gold Medals to those who have distinguished themselves in a wide array of professional fields and have made significant contributions to humanity. It has hosted a Gold Medal dinner annually since 1913. A complete list of previous Gold Medal recipients is available at the National Institute’s website.

Board of Trustees Elects New Leadership

 

The Board of Trustees of the National Institute of Social Sciences is pleased to announce that Frederick R. Larsen, a managing director at Oppenheimer & Co., has been elected as its new president.

Richard Dyke Benjamin was elected as treasurer. Kent Barwick, Joan K. Davidson, Thomas F. Pike, Nicholas A. Robinson and William H. Told, Jr. were reelected as vice presidents, and Gracey Stoddard was reelected secretary.

“I am delighted to take the reins of this great organization with such experienced and enthusiastic fellow officers to guide and assist me,” says Mr Larsen. “The energy and promise I have seen among the members of this organization are exciting.”

Mr. Larsen succeeds Chauncey G. Olinger, Jr., who remains one of the organization’s trustees.

Mr. Larsen is managing director at Oppenheimer & Co., where he runs the transportation and logistics investment banking practice. He has over 27 years of experience in mergers and acquisitions, corporate finance and capital raising across multiple sectors. He has an A.B. (cum laude) from Princeton University in politics and an M.B.A. from the Columbia Business School with Beta Gamma Sigma honors.

Mr. Benjamin is a managing director at Axiom Capital Management in New York. Previously, he was a director of Lazard Asset Management. Mr. Benjamin is a project consultant for AKA Strategy, a strategic advisor to not-for-profit organizations, and an advisor and board member for several philanthropic and religious organizations. He holds a B.A. from Harvard College and a M.B.A. from Harvard Business School.

About the National Institute of Social Sciences
Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences (socialsciencesinstitute.org) is an honorary society of Americans dedicated by service and philanthropy to the public good and joined together to recognize and celebrate those who have achieved at the highest level. In addition to presenting its Gold Medals each year, the National Institute makes grants to graduate students in the social sciences and has a vibrant chapter in Palm Beach, Florida.

Ron Chernow, Robert J. Shiller and Michael I. Sovern to Receive Gold Honor Medals on November 14

 Ron Chernow, Robert J. Shiller and Michael I. Sovern

Ron Chernow, Robert J. Shiller and Michael I. Sovern

The National Institute of Social Sciences will honor three distinguished Americans--author and biographer Ron Chernow, economist and Nobel laureate Robert J. Shiller, and Columbia University president emeritus Michael I. Sovern--at the 103rd Gold Medal Dinner on Tuesday, November 14, in New York City.

Ron Chernow’s bestselling books include The House of Morgan, winner of the National Book Award; The Warburgs, which won the George S. Eccles Prize; The Death of the Banker; Titan: The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr., nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award; Washington: A Life, which received the Pulitzer Prize for Biography; and Alexander Hamilton, nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award and adapted into the award-winning Broadway musical Hamilton. Chernow is a past president of PEN, has received eight honorary doctoral degrees, and was awarded the 2015 National Humanities Medal. His newest book, Grant, is scheduled to be published in October 2017.

Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University, and professor of finance and a fellow at the International Center for Finance at the Yale School of Management. In 2013, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen. Since 1980, he has been a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. In 1991, he co-founded the firm Case Shiller Weiss, which produced the Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, now published by Standard & Poor’s. He has been vice president of the American Economic Association (2005), president of the Eastern Economic Association (2006-07), and president of the American Economic Association (2016).

Michael I. Sovern is president emeritus of Columbia University and Chancellor Kent Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. He joined the  Columbia law faculty in 1957, served as chair of the Executive Committee of the Faculty (1968-69); dean of the law school (1970-79); university provost (1979-80); and university president (1980-93). He has served as chairman of Sotheby's and president of the Shubert Foundation. Sovern has been a mediator between the New York Transit Authority and the Transport Workers Union, as well as between New York City and its firefighters and policemen. He has been a consultant to Time magazine and the Ford Foundation. 

The National Institute has presented the Gold Honor Medals annually since 1913 to distinguished Americans who have significantly contributed to the improvement of society. Previous honorees include four former U.S. Presidents, Supreme Court justices and other members of the judiciary, six former U.S. Secretaries of State, as well numerous luminaries in academia, law, government, education, philanthropy, the arts, medicine, science, and industry.

About the National Institute of Social Sciences
Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences is an honorary society of Americans dedicated by service and philanthropy to the public good and joined together to recognize and celebrate those who have achieved at the highest level. In addition to presenting the Gold Honor Medals each year, the National Institute makes grants to graduate students in the social sciences, and has a vibrant chapter in Palm Beach, Florida.

For information about the National Institute or the Gold Medal Dinner, please contact the National Institute's office at (212) 831-0560 or natins2@verizon.net.

Bruce Stillman Headlines National Institute's Annual Luncheon

 Dr. Bruce Stillman at the Issues Discussion Luncheon (Credit: Michael Dames/National Institute of Social Sciences)

Dr. Bruce Stillman at the Issues Discussion Luncheon (Credit: Michael Dames/National Institute of Social Sciences)

The National Institute of Social Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest honorary societies, welcomed 70 guests to its annual Issues Discussion Luncheon on Monday, June 5. The luncheon, which was held in midtown Manhattan, is the major event in the National Institute’s spring calendar.

Chauncey G. Olinger, Jr., the National Institute’s president, welcomed the guests, noting that this event marked the 26th year that the National Institute has held an issues discussion luncheon in New York City.

The luncheon program began with brief remarks from Dr. Zachary Cooper and Mr. Hirokazu Shirado, a previous and the current recipient of a National Institute’s Seed Grant. Dr. Cooper, who earned his doctorate at Princeton and is now a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, DC, noted that the Seed Grant was "hugely important in completing my work." Mr. Shirado, who is completing his degree in Yale's Sociology Department, credited his Seed Grant with "keeping my studies going."

CLICK ON ARROWS TO ADVANCE SLIDESHOW

The keynote speaker was Dr. Bruce Stillman, the president and chief executive officer of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, who discussed the rise of gene-editing techniques and their implications for the modern world.

"We are in the middle of a scientific revolution," Dr. Stillman said.

Through artificial selection, "humans have been intervening in the way species look for a long, long time.” But the development of new gene-editing techniques, including CRISPR-Cas9, has raised new possibilities and questions. "Secondary effects are now the reason people are hesitant about gene editing," he said.

This explosion of new knowledge means that scientific literacy is more important than ever. Yet, Dr. Stillman worried that science faced new threats in today’s political environment. “Scientific education in some parts of the country is being suppressed,” he said.

About the National Institute of Social Sciences
Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences (www.socialsciencesinstitute.org) is an honorary society of Americans dedicated by service and philanthropy to the public good and to honoring those who have achieved at the highest level. Since its founding, the National Institute has presented its Gold Honor Medals to distinguished Americans, established a vibrant chapter in Palm Beach, Florida, and made grants to graduate students in the social sciences.

 

Kaplan Fund Makes Grant to National Institute

  Joan K. Davidson  (Credit: Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

Joan K. Davidson (Credit: Samira Bouaou/Epoch Times)

The National Institute of Social Sciences is pleased to announce that it has received a generous grant from the J.M. Kaplan Fund (www.jmkfund.org), a New York-based philanthropic foundation known for its innovative support of the environment, preservation, the arts, and civil liberties.

The grant, which will be used to provide general operating support for the National Institute, was recommended by Joan K. Davidson, who is a member of the National Institute’s Board of Trustees. From 1977 to 1993, Mrs. Davidson was president of the Kaplan Fund, which was established by her father in 1945. Now the Fund’s president emeritus and a trustee, she is a widely respected advocate and supporter of philanthropic causes in New York City and the Hudson Valley.

“Everyone at the National Institute of Social Sciences is enormously grateful to Joan and to the J.M. Kaplan Fund for this wonderful show of support,” said Chauncey G. Olinger, Jr., the National Institute’s president. “This grant will help the National Institute continue its important work of honoring and celebrating the achievements of extraordinary Americans.”

 

About The National Institute of Social Sciences

Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences (www.socialsciencesinstitute.org) is an honorary society of Americans dedicated by service and philanthropy to the public good and joined together to recognize and celebrate those who have achieved at the highest level. Since its founding, the National Institute has presented Gold Medals to distinguished honorees, established a vibrant chapter in Palm Beach, Florida, and made grants to graduate students in the social sciences.

 

Bruce Stillman to Discuss "Changing Human Genes" at National Institute of Social Sciences' Issues Discussion Luncheon on Monday, June 5th

 Dr. Bruce Stillman, President and CEO of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Dr. Bruce Stillman, President and CEO of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Bruce Stillman, the president and chief executive officer of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, will speak at the annual Issues Discussion Luncheon of the National Institute of Social Sciences on Monday, June 5th, in Manhattan.

Dr. Stillman, whose research focuses on how chromosomes are duplicated in cells, will discuss "Changing Human Genes: Choices for Humanity," focusing on CRISPR-Cas9, a new technique that allows geneticists to modify genes in human embryos. CRISPR holds the potential to alter the human genome with enormous consequences for the future of the human race.

A native of Australia, Dr. Stillman earned his a B.S. degree with honors at the University of Sydney and a Ph.D. from the John Curtin School of Medical Research at the Australian National University. He moved to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory as a postdoctoral fellow in 1979 and joined the scientific staff in 1981. Dr. Stillman was director of the Laboratory's Cancer Center from 1992 to 2016. In 1994, he succeeded Nobel Laureate Dr. James D. Watson as director of the Laboratory and became president in 2003. 

Dr. Stillman is a member of the Royal Society, the US National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has received five honorary doctorates. 

Tickets to the luncheon are $100. Seating is limited. Please contact the National Institute at (212) 831-0560 for information.

About The National Institute of Social Sciences
Established in 1912, the National Institute of Social Sciences (www.socialsciencesinstitute.org) is an honorary society of Americans dedicated by service and philanthropy to the public good and joined together to recognize and celebrate those who have achieved at the highest level. Since its founding, the National Institute has presented Gold Medals to distinguished honorees, established a vibrant chapter in Palm Beach, Florida, and made grants to graduate students in the social sciences

Barbara Tober to be Honored at "8 Over 80" Gala

   
  
 
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    Barbara Tober at the 2014 Giving Back Foundation Gala in New York.

Barbara Tober at the 2014 Giving Back Foundation Gala in New York.

The National Institute of Social Sciences congratulates trustee Barbara Tober and her husband, Donald, who will be honored for their philanthropy by the New Jewish Home at the fourth annual “Eight Over 80” benefit. The gala, which celebrates “the creativity and significance of the over-80 generation,” will be held on Tuesday, April 4, at the Mandarin Oriental in Manhattan.

Other honorees include designer Iris Apfel, actress, dancer and choreographer Carmen de Lavallade, civil rights leader Vernon Jordan, television producer Norman Lear, chef Jacques Pépin, and businessman/philantropist Morris W. Offit.

For more information, or tickets, visit the Eight over Eighty website: http://8over80.org.

Adele Smithers, Former Trustee, Passes Away

The National Institute of Social Sciences mourns the passing of Adele Smithers, a longtime member and a former trustee. In addition to her association with the National Institute, Mrs. Smithers had expanded on her late husband’s philanthropy in support of recovering alcoholics in New York and had spearheaded a significant lawsuit that empowered benefactors to safeguard the original purposes of their donations.

“Adele Smithers had a long and distinguished association with our organization,” said Chauncey G. Olinger, Jr., president of the National Institute of Social Sciences. “She will be deeply missed by her many friends.”

Read the New York Times obituary of Mrs. Smithers

Read Ray Negron’s tribute to Mrs. Smithers at NY Sportsday

Read Mrs. Smithers's official biography at the Christopher D. Smithers Foundation